<html>
<font size=3>&quot;A lot of new cell phones seem to have touch screens,
completely useless to the blind. I'd like to think that google <br>
would get this right but I seriously doubt it.&quot;<br><br>
&quot;Oh, and there will definitely be Android devices with touchscreens.
Since the iPhone, everything has to have a touchscreen, we
understand.&quot;<br><br>
Why you should care about Google Android<br><br>
09 Nov 2007 10:24<br><br>
The search specialist's open-source mobile plaform has the telephony
industry hot under the collar  but what will it mean for the average
business user?<br><br>
Is there such a thing as a Google phone, or &quot;Gphone&quot;, 
yet?<br>
No. Google has announced an industry group, the<br>
Open Handset Alliance,<br>
which promises to produce phones by the second half of next year  and
promises, furthermore, that they will be exciting in ways that have yet
to be announced.<br><br>
The phones will use a free Linux operating system from Google subsidiary
Android, which is producing a free software-development kit for phone
makers and<br>
application developers, released under the Apache v2 licence. A
&quot;first look&quot; at the SDK will be released on 12
November.<br><br>
Will there ever be a Gphone?<br>
Google won't say, and the answer depends on the conditions handset makers
and operators agree to. The world of phones is undergoing a branding
crisis: operators<br>
such as O2 and Vodafone want their name on the phones, and so do most
handset manufacturers, such as Nokia, Sony Ericsson and now
Apple.<br><br>
If all goes according to plan, there will be lots of phones based on the
Open Handset Alliance, running Google-based services. Handset maker HTC,
previously<br>
wedded to Microsoft's Windows Mobile, has promised to deliver Android
phones.<br><br>
But however much people love Google, it's not clear whether they want a
Google-branded phone.<br><br>
What will Android phones do?<br>
It is all speculation. Spokespeople have talked of &quot;innovations we
can't even envisage yet&quot;  which translates as &quot;we don't
know&quot;.<br><br>
We can say that they will have a good browser, one that people will
actually want to use. There won't be any point launching the phones
otherwise. They'll<br>
support services that, like most projected &quot;killer-apps&quot; for
mobile internet, will be location-based and identity-based. Essentially,
Google's targeted<br>
adverts beamed to you and relevant to where you are.<br><br>
Oh, and there will definitely be Android devices with touchscreens. Since
the iPhone, everything has to have a touchscreen, we 
understand.<br><br>
Will the phones be open?<br>
Again, this is not clear. The software will be open source, and will
provide a platform (probably several, including Java and web browser) for
operators<br>
to develop applications on.<br><br>
But that does not require the handset maker or the operator to deliver an
&quot;unlocked&quot; phone that lets the user choose applications (and
possibly operators).<br>
Operators may want to lock these phones into specific services, just as
they do with phones such as the iPhone, and there's nothing to stop such
contracts<br>
emerging.<br><br>
So why is Google doing this then?<br>
Advertising revenue. There are projections of billions of dollars of
advertising revenue from the mobile internet. Google wants to hoover up
as much of<br>
that as it can, just as it already does with internet advertising
accessed over fixed links. It already has some deals, for instance to put
Google Maps<br>
on Sony Ericsson phones, but it believes it could do a lot better if
operators can be persuaded to let users out of their walled
gardens.<br><br>
What's in it for the operators?<br>
In exchange for giving up their walled gardens, the operators get the
promise of a cheaper handset platform, and one which will develop faster
and have<br>
more applications  if the Android ecosystem works as planned.<br><br>
Has anyone put Linux on a mobile phone before?<br>
Plenty of people have tried, and anyone wanting to sneer at Android's
chances only has to point to the numbers of Linux phone alliances that
have been tried<br>
before.<br><br>
In fact, Linux phones are quite successful in the Far East, where they
have a respectable market share in smartphones, and ship in volumes
comparable to<br>
that of Windows Mobile. Both those operating systems pale beside the
market share of Symbian however, which provides an open platform, which
anyone can<br>
develop to, albeit one that the operators have to pay a licence fee
for.<br><br>
What's been the problem with mobile Linux?<br>
It's been difficult to persuade the diverse Linux community to create the
kind of single monolithic software that a phone needs, then to persuade
operators<br>
to use it and developers to build to it, and finally users to buy
it.<br><br>
With 34 members, including significant operators (Telefonica O2 and
T-Mobile, and KDDI and DoCoMo in Asia) Android is already doing far
better than any<br>
previous Linux phone effort.<br><br>
Will Android phones be useful in business?<br>
They'll be as useful as any other smartphone. Like all significant phone
developments, and most web developments at present, Android is aimed
squarely at<br>
consumers. That's where there is money, and individuals with the freedom
to spend it.<br><br>
Businesses are too conservative to adopt Android quickly, and may well be
scared of it initially if they perceive its openness as increasing the
risk of<br>
malware.<br><br>
Will Android succeed?<br>
Google announced the Android platform along with other members of the
Open Handset Alliance, a group of 34 hardware and software companies plus
wireless<br>
carriers committed to creating open standards for mobile
devices.<br><br>
To succeed, it has to get a large market share, persuading operators to
actually deliver handsets and significant numbers of users to adopt it.
Google says<br>
that three billion people have mobile phones, compared with the billion
on the internet  but the majority of those phones are low-end feature
phones that<br>
won't be able to benefit from Android. Most of the users are on pre-pay
rather than a contract, so they won't be able to benefit from the
high-value, identity-related<br>
services that might be offered on top of Android.<br><br>
Another problem is that phone screens are smaller, so it may be
physically difficult for Google to squeeze enough ads in without annoying
the users.<br><br>
Openness may count in its favour, but the success of the iPhone may well
demonstrate that users generally don't care about openness, as long as
there's<br>
a convincing advertising campaign.<br>
Story URL:
<a href="http://resources.zdnet.co.uk/articles/faq/0,1000001997,39290669,00.htm" eudora="autourl">http://resources.zdnet.co.uk/articles/faq/0,1000001997,39290669,00.htm</a><br><br>
Copyright  1995-2006 CNET Networks, Inc. All rights reserved<br>
ZDNET is a registered service mark of CNET NEtworks, Inc. ZDNET Logo is a
service mark of CNET Networks, Inc.<br><br>
At 11/15/2007, you wrote:<br>
<blockquote type=cite class=cite cite>This is a good letter. I can only
hope that someone from these cell phone <br>
companies reads it. From what I can tell it doesn't seem like any of them
<br>
are giving any thought at all to accessable cell phones. If anything they
<br>
seem to be making things worse, a lot of new cell phones seem to have
touch <br>
screens, completely useless to the blind. I'd like to think that google
<br>
would get this right but I seriously doubt it.<br><br>
On Thu, 15 Nov 2007, Per wrote:<br><br>
&gt; I have written an open letter to Google, the Open Handset Alliance
and also<br>
&gt; to Nokia.<br>
&gt; It's about the chance of the Open Source Android Operating System
for blind<br>
&gt; &amp; visually impaired people from the poor countries and also
about the great<br>
&gt; LS project.<br>
&gt; Do you have suggestions for more or better arguments?<br>
&gt; You can answer me with private mail as well.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;
<a href="http://de.mini.wikia.com/wiki/Open_letter_initiative" eudora="autourl">http://de.mini.wikia.com/wiki/Open_letter_initiative</a><br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Best regards from Per<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; _______________________________________________<br>
&gt; Loadstone mailing list<br>
&gt; Loadstone@loadstone-gps.com<br>
&gt;
<a href="http://www.loadstone-gps.com/mailman/listinfo/loadstone" eudora="autourl">http://www.loadstone-gps.com/mailman/listinfo/loadstone</a><br>
&gt;<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Loadstone mailing list<br>
Loadstone@loadstone-gps.com<br>
<a href="http://www.loadstone-gps.com/mailman/listinfo/loadstone" eudora="autourl">http://www.loadstone-gps.com/mailman/listinfo/loadstone</a>
</font></blockquote></html>